Three quick lessons you can learn from Super Bowls ads

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Three quick lessons you can learn from Super Bowls ads

1. Super Bowl ads are not for you – even if you could afford them. Cash cow brands don’t need to tell their product’s story. Everyone knows it. They simply need to figuratively tap people on the shoulder and remind them to buy. Any clever little ditty or skit will do the trick.

Wouldn’t it be nice if your product was so well known, that’s all you had to do? Instead, you need to do the work that every cash cow brand had to do when they were introduced. You need to find wide promotional channels that allow you the time and space to teach and persuade people to buy. Places where you can tell your story, not a joke.

2. All marketers, including those working with cash cow brands, love a big audience. If you’re selling to the public, mass marketing is always good. The more people that hear your story, the better. So when you market, look for inexpensive ways to get in front of the masses.

3. People need to be listening. One reason Super Bowl ads cost so much is it’s a rare occasion when people tune into ads rather than tune them out. Have you ever watched a speaker who has lost control of their audience? It’s embarrassing: everyone gabbing away while the speaker stands red-faced with no one paying attention. That’s what most advertising is like – a speaker with no one paying attention.

To sum it all up: in a low cost way you need to tell your story to the masses when they’re willing to listen. Publicity is probably the best way to do that. It’s cheap and it tells a story to the masses when they are listening.

Publicity is a marketer’s dream and the funny thing is, very few companies use it.

Why is that? I’ve always said it’s because of the way the PR industry sells its publicity service – by the hour with no guarantee you’ll get any. How much pizza do you think Papa John’s would sell with that pricing strategy?

Our nationally trademarked Pay Per Interview Publicity® pricing model changes that. We charge per story and clients love it.

Why not use publicity as a way of spreading your product’s story in 2013? If you’re like most companies, you got a dibble of media attention in 2012. Do something different this year. Open the publicity spout by putting our publicists to work calling the media on your behalf.

Heather Champine, who heads up our team of publicists, can give you a quick assessment of how interested the media would be in your story and how much it would cost to work with us. Her phone number is 612-798-7269. And unlike the Super Bowl ads, it doesn’t cost anything to see what she thinks.

 

 

Written by

Lonny pioneered the concept of our nationally trademarked Pay Per Interview Publicity business model which allows clients to purchase publicity by the story rather than pay hourly with no guarantee of coverage. His business foresight is evident in many ways including quickly reserving portal web addresses such as publicity, media relations, and checkerboard, and advising clients to do the same. Lonny has written two books: Media Hypnosis: Unleashing the most powerful sales tool on earth, published in 2002 and Reach & Teach Product Promotion: Teaching Consumers to BUY in 2007. In his spare time, Lonny teaches marketing as an adjunct faculty member at Dakota Technical College.